#ShiaGenocide

Downright ethnic cleansing

One-fifth of Pakistan’s population stands in the way of the ‘purification’ of Pakistan. And so, the quasi-Nazis of what is increasingly becoming the Takfiri Deobandi Republic of Pakistan are out for blood. Their Saudi-funded rose-tinted glasses filter out the kafirs as they enlist targets with only a solitary criterion sufficing in issuing death warrants amidst bellows of the greatness of Allah: Shiism.

Rest assured this is no “sectarian violence” – it’s not a two-way war. Shias are being targeted as a part of barefaced ethnic cleansing, while the nation slumbers with firm fingers on their lips, allowing the likes of Lashkar-e-Jhangvi (LeJ), Tehreek-e-Taliban Pakistan (TTP) and Sipah-e-Sahaba (SSP) to wreak havoc with the country’s largest minority. Around 20,000 Shias have been killed in Pakistan since its inception while the stubborn fingers refuse to budge an inch.

While our armchair jihadis and Facebook revolutionaries raucously protest against the killings and siege in Gaza, their silence on the siege and massacre in Hazara runs the whole gamut from being hypocritical to downright pathetic. Remonstrating against Shia killings might not earn as many Facebook ‘likes’ or fuel their comical pseudo ‘activist’ status like a pro-Gaza comment does, but if they’re really that fretful about human rights, if they’re really endeavouring to fight against the killing of innocent people and if they’re really the flag-bearers of justice, tolerance and equality they wouldn’t find a more pertinent cause to voice their opinion than the systematic massacre of Shias – the most targeted sect in the country.

Over 375 Shias have been killed this year alone (some reports suggest over 500), which is the biggest tally for the past two decades. In addition to the siege in Parachanar, you’ve had examples like the attack on a bus in Gilgit when 26 Shias were dragged out and executed, which was the most high-profile of three such incidents in 2012; the case of Mehzar Zehra, a 12-year-old girl who had to bear the gruesome sight of her own father being brutally killed; and the 51 incidents of violence in November as Muharram reverberated with echoes of “Shia kafir” and “Kill Shias”, as 55 succumbed to religious animosity in the holiest month for Shias.

While there has been condemnation and action against the targeted killings courtesy Interior Minister, Rehman Malik, the fingers are only being pointed towards a “foreign hand”, quite often a euphemism for India. When LeJ leaders like Malik Ishaq – a man acquitted 30 times after charges of terrorism and homicide – officially declare Shias the “greatest infidels” and extrovertly demand that Shias be declared non-Muslims, and others like Mahmoud Baber are chuffed at committing 14 murders and define LeJ’s raison d’être as, “getting rid of the Shias”, you know that the hands involved in Shia killings are quite unmistakably local. And these hands have their grip firmly around this country’s neck as they gradually suffocate the nation into submission.

If there’s anything foreign about this catastrophic scenario, it is the origin of this repugnant ideological war, as Gulf ideologues have found an acquiescing nation to turn into a battlefield. Our inane love-in with the Arabs and disregard for our compatriots over ideological differences is arguably the biggest predicament that faces the country, as things stand, with Pakistan posting up pretty wretched numbers of intolerance.

If PEW’s research is anything to go by 50 percent of the Sunnis in Pakistan believe Shias to be non-Muslims and this insularity and blinkeredness over the most minuscule of ideological differences is exactly what is pushing this country downhill. Every other person has their own ‘kafirometre’ that gauges the level of impurity in the ‘land of the pure’ and marks down those that have to be purged out. And no other community has had to bear this repulsive litmus test more than the Pakistani Shias.

An online protest was launched by a few activists last Sunday, with another online demonstration planned for today. The previous protest garnered thousands of tweets and Facebook posts, with the #ShiaGenocide hash tag generating over three million impressions in a single day. The activists from various sects and ideologies are coming together and making their presence felt on the Web to fight against religious bigotry and strive against Shia genocide. This struggle needs to continue, and people need to become more vocal in their condemnation of bigots and their violent manifestos, if we are to drag this nation out of the religious quagmire.

When 40 million people of a country are unyieldingly under the cosh of religious fanaticism, turbulence is bound to brim over. We need to incorporate acceptance and tolerance into our social setup and condemn everyone who gives holier than thou verdicts over religious differences. And if one were to quote Gerry Duggan, if anyone believes their ideology is worth killing for, maybe they should start with themselves.

The writer is Editor, Business and City (Karachi), Pakistan Today. Email: [email protected], Twitter: @khuldune



16 Comments

  1. Anwar Bhojani said:

    excellent article.There were 10000 souls protest against the genocide of shias in New york on Friday.Not a single word in Pakistantoday.Thanks Anwar Winnipeg,Canada

  2. Warda Bhatti said:

    Excellent article… the unfortunate thing is that we are ready to protest for those who are brutally killed in Gaza or if its a desecration to Ahmedis graves in Lahore but we are silent when one whole community is being targeted and we are just sitting and doing nothing….We see no media coverage or kind of serious action taken by government nor do we see our so called mullas or ullema's coming forward to say anything in this issue. Its a shameful act by us all Pakistanis..We should first stand as nation and protect the citizen of our own country and then stand for others.. If we cant stand for each other than how can we stand for others ……
    A very thought provoking article written Kunwar…. a job well done

  3. nicholas biniaris said:

    Having a keen interest for Pakistan, which I consider to be a pivot state for any Muslim reformation, I read regularly Kunwar's articles. His description of a grim reality and his warnings about Pakistan and the predicament of Islam offer a valuable insight for all who want to unserstand the historical period we live in.

  4. xanaduskublakhan said:

    Excellent, excellent article. You capture the essence of the situation. Unfortunately most of the media, western or eastern, is distorting the entire reality.

  5. Mehr Tarar said:

    Many recommended it to me the whole day. Now even on my fb, someone posted it from Delhi. All I want to say is: thank you for writing it. Each word is the stark truth. And each word matters today. This is the only way the apathy may be dented some day. Keep up the great work. God bless

  6. Hassan said:

    Finally, a voice for the Shiites…wish the nation would stop turning deaf ears to such cries!

  7. Huda Jafri said:

    I couldn’t agree more! Pakistan is indeed in a confused state where it has to find a balance between religion and politics. Thumbs up for pointing out the human rights activists, who can feel or muslims in Gaza and Burma, but not a single status is updated for shia muslims of their own country. Hypocrisy much! Well written!

  8. @saad_durrani said:

    Talk about fueling the fire. While it is hurtful to see Shias are being targeted left, right and centre, the author also seems to miss out on certain details. Sunnis in the bus asked the militants to leave the Shia men alone. Somehow, it is being played as Shia vs Sunni where as it is not like. It is more complex. One sect of Sunnis is killing the other. It is high time we start damage control. Sermons should be regulated. Places of worship should be registered and planned accordingly. A mosque on every street does not make much sense.

  9. Kevin said:

    Ironic it might seem but a solution to end this sad situation can also be found in the very Saudi Arabia who fuelled it in the first place.
    I think the answer lies in the state having complete control over the ulema and the mosques in the country very much like how it is in Saudi. There even the friday sermons have to be concurred with the the stated policy of the govt.
    A similar control in Pakistan might turn out to be the magic bullet for all its problems

  10. Shahid Zaidi said:

    World wide ignorance from the true believe, I mean lack of preparation for the eternal life, only thinking the Worldly life as ultimate, Saudi Arabia is in lead of all this comming on Shias, and other communities, except for their own brand, I pray Allah soon gives the land of sacred cities like Mecca-e- Mukarama and Medina tu Nabi to the real heirs, I mean Muhammad Arabia instead of Saudi Arabia, this country should be called, only then, Shias and other communities in Pakistan also in some other countries can live in peace which is true Islam.

  11. shahzad said:

    The perception about Saudi's involvement in promoting this agenda is getting more stronger among Pakistanis and I'm not sure why our Government authorities and agencies are sleeping. As a nation, we should not only condemn, but also stand united against those who are fueling this fire.

    • fjmuhammed said:

      Is Iran not involved in promoting its agenda i.e. shiite in nebouring countries. If not why so much counsel generals and farhangs. More over the shiite majority can't afford a single mousque.

      • shahzad said:

        Your comments are completely irrelevant to the article. Try to understand, by enlarging the Shiite-Sunni divide, it's empowering Wahhabi fanatics, funded and supported by Saudi Arabia and the Gulf monarchies. On the other hand Iran's farhangs etc… were part of our society from 60's and never caused any chaos compared to what's happening now days.

  12. Syed Shah said:

    Good Article. Situation is more worse, as this article mostly focused on killing. The Discremination in jobs, higer posts, assignments, daily life and society is rising rapidly with the actions of even Government.

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