Tim McGraw, Faith Hill and Ed Sheeran hit with copyright lawsuit

Tim McGraw and Faith Hill, who together released a song in October titled The Rest of Our Life, along with Ed Sheeran who is credited with co-writing this tune, have all been summoned to court in the latest copyright lawsuit targeting a chart-topper, according to The Hollywood Reporter.

The complaint was filed on Wednesday in New York federal court by Sean Carey and Beau Golden, two Australians who say the McGraw/Hill track is a “blatant copy” of their own 2014 song When I Found You.

“The copying is, in many instances, verbatim, note-for-note copying of original elements of the song, and is obvious to the ordinary observer,” stated the complaint.

The three music superstars along with co-writers Johnny McDaid and Amy Wadge as well as music industry giants Sony/ATV, Universal Polygram, WB Music plus others must respond to new charges of ripping off material. In this case, it is alleged that the copying was fully known by the employees of Sony Music.

“It very well may have been an agent of Sony Music Entertainment who provided the other defendants herein with access to the song,” the complaint said.

According to the lawsuit, Carey and Golden have record deals with major labels and music direction positions with Netflix. When I Found You was released on ABC Records by co-writer and recording artist Jasmine Rae and was a hit in Australia.

Rae and Golden were in Carey’s studio to write music last month, continues the complaint, when Rae allegedly mentioned a fan tweet about the Tim McGraw and Faith Hill song. The three listened and soon investigated taking legal action.

An alternative theory of access, also provided in the complaint, states that Sheeran was allegedly touring in Australia when When I Found You was enjoying its biggest success on local airwaves.

Both songs are said to explore themes of marriage, the passage of time, aging and the way that the romantic relationship protects the speaker against the vulnerability.

Carey and Golden are seeking injunctive relief and at least $5 million in actual damages plus profits, a running royalty and an award of attorney’s fees and costs.



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