Food for thought… | Pakistan Today

Food for thought…

Food imports into the country decreased to $ 5.048 billion during Financial Year (2011-12), showing negative growth of 0.60 percent when compared to the exports of $ 5.078 billion during the corresponding period of the previous year.
The major food products that witnessed negative growth in imports during the period under review included milk, cream and milk food for infants, imports of which decreased by 2.81 percent, according to the data of Pakistan Bureau of Statistics (PBS). The imports of milk, cream and milk food were recorded at $161.169million in 2011-12 against the imports of $165.834 million during 2010-11.
Imports of wheat also decreased from $10.725 million to zero, showing hundred percent downfall while the imports of spices decreased from $103.992 million to $100.929 million, showing decrease of 2.95 percent. Imports of soybean oil also witnessed considerable fall of 23.18 percent by going down from $66.930 million in 2010-11 to $ 51.418mmillion while the imports of sugar decreased from $684.629 million to $15.460 million, a fall of 97.74 percent.
Meanwhile, the food products that witnessed positive growth in imports during the period under review included dry fruits and nuts, imports of which decreased by 2.76 percent. Similarly, the tea imports into the country increase by five percent from $334.064 million to $350.772 million while the imports of palm oil increased by 17.53 percent by going up from $2.020 billion to $2.374 billion.
The imports of pulses (leguminous vegetables) went up from $403.119 million to $433.436 million, an increase of 7.52 percent while the imports of all other food items increased by 22.42 percent, from $1.200 billion to $1.469 billion, the PBS data revealed. It is pertinent to mention here that the overall imports into the country during the period under review increase by 11.13 percent. The imports into the country during July-June (2011-12) stood at $44.912 billion against the imports of $40.414 billion recorded during July-June (2010-11), according to the date.



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